Wapsite tin tuc,phan mem,game,truyen
smarterplanet:

Infographic of the Day: The Next 25 Years in Emerging Tech | Co.Design
via poptech:

smarterplanet:

The well-loved education startup Codecademy is tapping into what appears to be a watershed moment for the inevitable spike in demand for computer science skills. Mashable’s Sarah Kessler offers some impressive statistics about the very recent explosion in interest:

Codeacademy, a startup that uses interactive online lessons to turn anyone into a computer programmer, has signed up 97,000 students in less than 48 hours for its New Year’s resolution class Code Year. That’s more than twice as many students as were enrolled in the 150 U.S. computer science undergraduate programs that the Computer Research Association surveyed last year. … All Codeacademy users already have access to these free lessons, which turn learning JavaScript into a game and will soon expand to other programming languages. The class emails will serve as reminders and guidance, putting individual lessons together in a cohesive curriculum.

Minutes after Kessley published her post, the student count broke the six-figure threshold and was nearing 101,000 at the time of this posting.

smarterplanet:

SmartHat Developers Hope to Make Construction Sites Safer - RFID Journal
Researchers at Georgia Tech and Duke University have developed and tested an energy-harvesting EPC Gen 2 RFID tag and reader designed to alert workers and equipment operators in the event of an imminent collision.
A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Real-time Automated Project Information and Decision Systems (RAPIDS) laboratory and Duke University have completed testing of an energy-harvesting radio frequency identification system that, when tags are attached to hard hats, can issue an alert in the event that heavy equipment is moving too close to a worker on a construction site. The solution is unique, in that the tag can operate from power stored on a built-in capacitor, enabling the tag to be smaller than it would have been if it had a battery, while also ensuring that the system does not fail due to batteries requiring replacement.

smarterplanet:

SmartHat Developers Hope to Make Construction Sites Safer - RFID Journal

Researchers at Georgia Tech and Duke University have developed and tested an energy-harvesting EPC Gen 2 RFID tag and reader designed to alert workers and equipment operators in the event of an imminent collision.

A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Real-time Automated Project Information and Decision Systems (RAPIDS) laboratory and Duke University have completed testing of an energy-harvesting radio frequency identification system that, when tags are attached to hard hats, can issue an alert in the event that heavy equipment is moving too close to a worker on a construction site. The solution is unique, in that the tag can operate from power stored on a built-in capacitor, enabling the tag to be smaller than it would have been if it had a battery, while also ensuring that the system does not fail due to batteries requiring replacement.

smarterplanet:

IBM: Black Friday Online Retail Spending Up 24.3 Percent | TechCrunch
Thanksgiving brought record online retail sales for the holiday, with spending up 39.3 percent over Thanksgiving 2010. And today, IBM Coremetrics data shows a 24.3 percent growth in online sales on Black Friday compared to the same period last year.
Mobile traffic on Black Friday was 14.3 percent of all retail traffic compared to 5.6 percent in 2010. Sales on mobile devices surged to 9.8 percent from 3.2 percent year over year. As we saw with PayPal stats from Thanksgiving and Black Friday, mobile shopping volume is increasing by over 500 percent this year.
Mobile shopping was actually led by Apple devices, with the iPhone and iPad ranking one and two for consumers shopping on mobile devices (5.4 percent and 4.8 percent respectively). Android came in third at 4.1 percent. Collectively iPhone and iPad accounted for 10.2 percent of all online retail traffic on Black Friday.
As predicted by eBay, Google and others, tablets were a major platform for shoppers this year. IBM says that shoppers using the iPad led to more retail purchases more often per visit than other mobile devices with conversion rates reaching 4.6 percent compared to 2.8 percent for overall mobile devices.

smarterplanet:

IBM: Black Friday Online Retail Spending Up 24.3 Percent | TechCrunch

Thanksgiving brought record online retail sales for the holiday, with spending up 39.3 percent over Thanksgiving 2010. And today, IBM Coremetrics data shows a 24.3 percent growth in online sales on Black Friday compared to the same period last year.

Mobile traffic on Black Friday was 14.3 percent of all retail traffic compared to 5.6 percent in 2010. Sales on mobile devices surged to 9.8 percent from 3.2 percent year over year. As we saw with PayPal stats from Thanksgiving and Black Friday, mobile shopping volume is increasing by over 500 percent this year.

Mobile shopping was actually led by Apple devices, with the iPhone and iPad ranking one and two for consumers shopping on mobile devices (5.4 percent and 4.8 percent respectively). Android came in third at 4.1 percent. Collectively iPhone and iPad accounted for 10.2 percent of all online retail traffic on Black Friday.

As predicted by eBay, Google and others, tablets were a major platform for shoppers this year. IBM says that shoppers using the iPad led to more retail purchases more often per visit than other mobile devices with conversion rates reaching 4.6 percent compared to 2.8 percent for overall mobile devices.

lostinamerica:

Appalachian Trail Approach, Amicalola Falls State Park, Georgia.

lostinamerica:

Appalachian Trail Approach, Amicalola Falls State Park, Georgia.

-cityoflove:

Madrid, Spain via cuellar

-cityoflove:

Madrid, Spain via cuellar

mothernaturenetwork:

The Irish Potato Famine was caused by a disease called potato blight that swept through Ireland’s farms, hitting the single strain of potatoes grown by most farmers. Up until the 1960s, the most popular banana in the world ate was the Gros Michel. It was all but wiped out by a fungal disease when we were forced to switch to the Cavendish. Here are 6 foods we could lose in an outbreak.

mothernaturenetwork:

The Irish Potato Famine was caused by a disease called potato blight that swept through Ireland’s farms, hitting the single strain of potatoes grown by most farmers. Up until the 1960s, the most popular banana in the world ate was the Gros Michel. It was all but wiped out by a fungal disease when we were forced to switch to the Cavendish. Here are 6 foods we could lose in an outbreak.

-cityoflove:

Madrid, Spain via cuellar

-cityoflove:

Madrid, Spain via cuellar

mothernaturenetwork:

The Irish Potato Famine was caused by a disease called potato blight that swept through Ireland’s farms, hitting the single strain of potatoes grown by most farmers. Up until the 1960s, the most popular banana in the world ate was the Gros Michel. It was all but wiped out by a fungal disease when we were forced to switch to the Cavendish. Here are 6 foods we could lose in an outbreak.

mothernaturenetwork:

The Irish Potato Famine was caused by a disease called potato blight that swept through Ireland’s farms, hitting the single strain of potatoes grown by most farmers. Up until the 1960s, the most popular banana in the world ate was the Gros Michel. It was all but wiped out by a fungal disease when we were forced to switch to the Cavendish. Here are 6 foods we could lose in an outbreak.

travelchannel:

Cairo, Egypt.
Submitted by brettkozinn. Submit your own travel photo here!

travelchannel:

Cairo, Egypt.

Submitted by brettkozinn. Submit your own travel photo here!